Weekly Reading List #118


By Cynthia Ayala

Christmas is tomorrow! I hope everyone is planning on having a great holiday. I’ll be working at my local theater so it’s going to be tough, but at least I will still be able to salvage the evening with my mom. If you plan on going to the movies, please buy your tickets in advance, lines are crazy, and it helps to make it seem less crazy for all of us working this holiday. Just remember to be nice and patient. Concession lines will be a pain, no matter how much staff we’ve got on. Patience is essential. And remember, we’re away from our families while you’re with yours. Holiday’s are always crazy, let’s just remember that.

Anyway, I get some days off afterward and with that, some time with my mom and my fiancé. And reading of course. So check out this weeks reading list. Happy reading!

1. Ash and Quill (The Great Library #3)

by Rachel Caine

Words can kill.

Hoarding all the knowledge of the world, the Great Library jealously guards its secrets. But now a group of rebels poses a dangerous threat to its tyranny…

Jess Brightwell and his band of exiles have fled London, only to find themselves imprisoned in Philadelphia, a city led by those who would rather burn books than submit. But Jess and his friends have a bargaining chip: the knowledge to build a machine that will break the Library’s rule.

Their time is running out. To survive, they’ll have to choose to live or die as one, to take the fight to their enemies—and to save the very soul of the Great Library…

2. Daughter of the Pirate King (Daughter of the Pirate King #1)

by Tricia Levenseller

There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.

Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.

More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.

3. Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook

by Christina Henry

From the national bestselling author of Alice comes a familiar story with a dark hook—a tale about Peter Pan and the friend who became his nemesis, a nemesis who may not be the blackhearted villain Peter says he is…

There is one version of my story that everyone knows. And then there is the truth. This is how it happened. How I went from being Peter Pan’s first—and favorite—lost boy to his greatest enemy.

Peter brought me to his island because there were no rules and no grownups to make us mind. He brought boys from the Other Place to join in the fun, but Peter’s idea of fun is sharper than a pirate’s sword. Because it’s never been all fun and games on the island. Our neighbors are pirates and monsters. Our toys are knife and stick and rock—the kinds of playthings that bite.

Peter promised we would all be young and happy forever.

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*Disclaimer: All synopsis are provided by Goodreads.

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